That’s My Mama

This is a little late, but better late than never. My mom will never read this, nor is she able to with her limited english. Oh well, here goes…

I’ve never been really close with my mom. Of all my family, I’d say I might have the weaker relationship with her. It’s not because she’s a horrible mom, but in retrospect that’s how the cards were dealt. She was always the one behind the scenes, I was always the one in the forefront. She was always quietly submissive, I was always outspokenly rebellious. She’d sit in back, while I took shotgun. In other words, we totally missed each other. Despite what the worn carpet trails of my house tell you, our lives never really had a chance to cross paths.

And I’ll admit, I was never the best son. I never appreciated my mom. I always took her for granted. I left her to hang dry. And worst of all, I never thanked her for anything. Let’s just say the relationship never had any traction to begin with because this stubborn little heart never had room. But despite the rough start, I’ve come to a point in my life where I’m more thankful for her than anyone else in my family. Because, in her, I see a woman that’s growing. Let me explain…

My QueenMy mom is an even keel, soft spoken, middle of the road, don’t rock the boat, worry wort. She never had a great passion for anything, from what I can remember. Plus, she was never the most religious type. She faithfully went to church and did the minimum that she needed to maintain her status as a “Christian”. This was the way she was all of my life. But one day, she came back from a woman’s retreat in Canada with a renewed energy and things changed.

I remember the day clearly. I was sitting at my kitchen counter reading my Bible when she turns around from the sink & asks me, “Have you read the entire Bible?” “That’s what I’m doing right now,” I replied. Then she said something that changed the course of our relationship. “Let’s read the Bible together.” It was a simple request for accountability, but it changed the course of how we interacted henceforth. It showed me something about my mother that I’d never known; she was breaking out of her shell. It took her longer than she’d originally planned, (I must’ve done it 2.5 times before she finally finished), but she finished nonetheless. It told me something of her character.

Ever since that fateful night, I’ve seen in my mother a renewed vigor for life. And the only explanation that I can give is that Jesus touched her in Canada. Now, I appreciate my mom for a lot of things. But the greatest thing about my mom that I’ve had a chance to admire is her consistent desire to grow. At her age she could choose to coast & take it easy for the downhill ride, but she won’t have any of it. At her age it would be easy to ride on past successes to define who she was in the present, but my mom would not have any of it. In her age, she picked up the piano. Her recitals were both cute & ridiculous, because she could be the grandmother of some of her fellow students & a peer to her piano teacher. She also decided to finish the Bible in its entirety & she did. And nowadays, she’s stretching herself to pray more & lead women’s Bible studies. If there’s one redeeming aspect of our relationship, it’s that she challenges me to change.

When I told her I felt called into full-time ministry as a Pastor. She replied, “I guess I have to pray more for you!” And from the very next morning until this day, she attends morning prayer to pray for me and my future. It’s this kind of dedication to not settling for mediocre that inspires me. I have an amazing mom and I have only God to thank for a great example.

John Mayer had it right in his lyrics to the song “Daughter”:

Boys, you can break
You’ll find out how much they can take
Boys will be strong
And boys soldier on
But boys would be gone without the warmth from
A womans good, good heart

I love you, Mom

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One Comment on “That’s My Mama”

  1. HJ says:

    Awww, what a sweet son you are.


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